TODAY'S NEWS
Daily
Intl. News
Business
Your Money
Sports
Sport Extra
IT (Database)
Auto Industry
Sunday Perspective

ENTERTAINMENT
Cover page
Holidays online
Hotels-airlines
Horizons Travel
Outlook
Real.Time
Restaurant Reviews
Restaurant Search

BANGKOKPOST.COM
Exclusive
BP e-Directory
Breakfast in Bangkok
Chiang Mai & the North
Eye on the Thai press
Kat's Window
Poet's Post
Political Arena
Thai Art
Thailand & Beyond
Thai-language news

SEARCH
Recent Issues
Complete Archives

CLASSIFIEDS
Classifieds

Check the weather
anywhere with


SPECIALS
56 Prominent Enterprises
Tribute to the King
In memory of Prince Mahidol
Hot Topics
Next Generation
Economic Review
Mid-Year 2002
Year-End 2001
Mid-Year 2001
Year-End 2000
Mid-Year 2000
Year-End 1999

PRODUCTS
Books
Subscriptions

SERVICES
Printing
Publishing

SOCIAL PROJECTS
LeperFoundation
Post Foundation
We Care

EDUCATION
Learning Post
Student Weekly
Word-a-Day

ADVERTISING
Int'l Print Ads
Web Ads

ABOUT US
Annual Report 2001
Annual Report 2000
Annual Report 1999

CONTACT US
Join our team
Get our newsletter
Register with Us
Our Directory

Front page News Business Entertainment

GENERAL NEWS - Wednesday 16 October 2002

News list 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

Previous storyNext story

ELEPHANT TRAINING CAMPS

Animal rights group urges tourist boycott

Video shows calves tortured, abused

Porpot Changyawa

An international animal protection group has launched a campaign urging holidaymakers to boycott Thailand, saying elephants being trained for tourism purposes are routinely subjected to torture and abuse.

The US-based People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals launched its ``Abusive Thailand: Elephant Cruelty'' campaign yesterday in Melbourne, Australia.

It presented a video showing elephant calves at training camps being beaten while chained in small cages, claiming this was a regularly adopted practice to break young elephants' bonds with their mothers.

The practice killed about 50% of the elephants subjected to it, PETA said.

Despite copies of the video having been supplied to the government, as well as embassies in Washington and Berlin, no action had been taken to stop the practice.

``Perhaps international embarrassment and the threat of diminishing tourist dollars will motivate them,'' said PETA representative Jane Garrison.

Roger Lohanan of the Animal Guardians Association said the government had also ignored locally based NGOs pushing for alternative training methods to hitting elephants with nail-laden sticks, and keeping them tethered over long periods.

Preecha Phuangkham of the Elephants Conservation Centre admitted harsh treatment of elephants by villagers and camps was common.

``Elephants [to be used for tourism purposes] need to be disciplined,'' he said. ``This is difficult in the beginning, and the animals may need to be beaten,'' he said.

Laws were currently being drafted to control the treatment of elephants, including the introduction of licenses for handlers, Mr Preecha said.

Tourism and Sports Minister Sonthaya Khunpluem said he had informed tourism chief Juthmas Siriwan about the campaign, adding he would look into the matter.

Mr Juthmas was unavailable for comment.

PETA's video can be seen at www.peta-online.org.




Previous storyNext story

Front page News Business Entertainment

Web Forum

Today's Web Poll : Cast your vote!


Copyright The Post Publishing Public Co., Ltd. 2002
Privacy Policy
Comments to: Webmaster
Advertising enquiries to: Internet Marketing
Printed display ad enquiries to: Display Ads
Full contact details: Bangkok Post Directory